US

‘Just incredible’: Necklace ‘saves man’s life’ after stopping bullet going into his neck

A man’s life was likely saved after a thick chain necklace prevented a bullet from going into his neck.

The shooting happened during an argument, said police in the US state of Colorado.

The .22 calibre bullet became lodged in the silver chain around the victim’s neck.

It left the unnamed man with only a puncture wound from last Tuesday’s attack.

Pic: Commerce City Police Department
Image:
The fact the necklace appeared not to be authentic silver probably saved the man’s life. Pic: Commerce City Police Department

Officers in Commerce City, near Denver, released photos of the bloodied chain and said in a Facebook post: “We’d say he really dodged a bullet – but in reality, he LODGED a bullet.

“This silver chain – approximately 10mm in width – is likely the only reason the victim of a shooting we responded to yesterday is still alive.”

The suspected gunman, who was also not identified, was arrested at the scene and charged with attempted murder.

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Police noted that while the necklace was silver in colour, it was likely not pure silver as silver is a softer metal and may not have stopped a bullet.

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“Maybe think twice before you knock a knock-off,” Commerce City Police Department joked.

“Just incredible,” it added.

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